Male emotion, trauma, and human endurance: a three-book essay.

This is a rather longer essay than usual, which I’ve been planning for a while. I often find myself reading-at first usually by accident, then on purpose as I realize what’s happening-several books in succession exploring similar themes. These are the times when (I’m beginning to think) I gain the deepest understanding and appreciation of the books I read.  Continue reading

Nina Is Not Ok: A Review.

This Fringe season I had the opportunity to attend Shappi Khorsandi’s live comedy show. So I thought I’d read her new novel, Nina Is Not Ok before the show, which was the following Thursday. I needn’t have worried about finishing in time: this book is one of those compulsively readable novels that pulls you in and doesn’t spit you out again until you’re finished with it. Continue reading

Press, poverty and the radical politics of pornography: The Printer’s Coffin, a Review

I picked up The Strangler Vine, the first novel in M.J. Carter’s Blake and Avery series, for the same reason I usually pick up a book: the cover. The American hardback edition of Strangler Vine has an exceptionally beautiful cover, but the book, and its continuation in The Printer’s Coffin*, have a lot more to offer than just good looks…  Continue reading

Hic svnt dracones: Temeraire and League of Dragons, a Review.

History is written by the winners, and while Napoléon himself was not, eventually, victorious, Naomi Novik’s Temeraire series is a triumph of historical fantasy. I’ve written in a previous post about how much I enjoy the worldbuilding in Temeraire, and that will comprise a part of this review, however there is plenty more to love about the series as well.

[warning: here there be spoilers] Continue reading